Tuning in with Lobby Boxer

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne  @chelseadufresne

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne @chelseadufresne

Lobby Boxer is a high-energy rock trio consisting of Zach Fendelman, Max Sandza and Andrew Gurney. Vocalist and guitarist Fendelman met drummer Sandza in high school, where the two were in a deathcore band called Gormogon together. Fendelman met bassist Gurney during freshman orientation while attending Webster University, both planning to study in the jazz program. As the three have grown together, they continue to inspire each other, finding their place and artistic strengths within the band.

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne  @chelseadufresne

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne @chelseadufresne

Fendelman eventually majored in and graduated with a degree in music composition, now working as a freelance composer and sound designer.

“Most of my work is in games under the name Fat Bard, and I also do films and other projects here and there,” the vocalist and guitarist explained.

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne  @chelseadufresne

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne @chelseadufresne

Sandza graduated with a degree in audio engineering and works as a sound technician, while Gurney graduated with a degree in fine arts with an emphasis in mixed media, including video and installation. In fact, their latest album cover, “Eugene’s Preference,” was designed by Gurney along with Brandon Bandy.  

He elaborated, “I'm a musician for sure, but I like to think of other things I do with equal value and think of myself more as a creative person first and foremost.”

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne  @chelseadufresne

Photo by Chelsea Dufresne @chelseadufresne

 Fendelman, Sandza and Gurney all seem to stick to their artistic roots, especially showing their hard work and talent through Lobby Boxer. Each person brings a certain aspect and talent to the forefront, giving this band a uniquely artistic sound. The three prefer to shy away from genre labels, and instead, focus on letting the music grasp the reins and take a life of its own. It’s hard to ignore their sound with its high energy and genre-blurring style.

 “We don’t really feel like a single genre accurately describes our sound,” Fendelman explained. “Plus there are a lot of connotations that come with certain genres and subgenres, so we’d rather have the music speak for itself.”

Read the rest of the of the story on page 18 of Issue One